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Arthur Eddington

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Astrophysicist.

Arthur Eddington (1882–1944): British astrophysicist. He was also a philosopher of science and a popularizer of science. The Eddington limit, the natural limit to the luminosity of stars, or the radiation generated by accretion onto a compact object, is named in his honor.


Source:

1.) Kelly Ryan Harriger (2009). God: An Unauthorized Biography. Xulon Press. p. 49. ISBN 9781607916147. "When Einstein's General Theory of Relativity became commonly accepted around 1927 as proof that the Universe had a beginning, the astronomer and astrophysicist Sir Arthur Eddington, an atheist, commented in his book The Nature of the Physical World: "Religion first became possible for a reasonable man of science in the year 1927." In all fairness to Sir Eddington, it should be noted that many of his defenders have complained that this statement has been used out of context because it's not consistent with Eddington's personal atheistic views..."

2.) "Arthur Eddington". Quotable Atheist: Ammunition for Nonbelievers, Political Junkies, Gadflies, and Those Generally Hell-Bound. Nation Books. 2008. ISBN 9781568584195.

3.) Marcia Bartusiak. "Einstein and Beyond". National Geographic Society. p. 3. Retrieved 21 August 2012. "With or without that extra ingredient, the basic recipe for the expanding universe was Einstein's. But it was left to others to identify one revolutionary implication: a moment of cosmic creation. In 1931 the Belgian priest and astrophysicist Georges Lemaître put the fleeing galaxies into reverse and imagined them eons ago merged in a fireball of dazzling brilliance—a "primeval atom," as he put it. "The evolution of the world can be compared to a display of fireworks that has just ended: some few red wisps, ashes and smoke," wrote Lemaître. From this poetic scenario arose today's big bang. Many were appalled by this concept. "The notion of a beginning… is repugnant to me," said British astrophysicist Arthur Eddington in 1931."